General

What’s the best way to approach a professor?

Professors hold office hours weekly, and welcome students. You may want to contact the professor beforehand to see if making an appointment is necessary (there is an online list of contact information for the faculty, including office hours). Many students are intimidated by the idea of approaching a professor. Remember that you must be proactive in establishing a relationship with a faculty member; the faculty member most likely does not have time to seek you out, and has many other students. Most faculty members, however, tell us that they are disappointed that more students don’t... Read more about What’s the best way to approach a professor?

I want to change my concentration to Government. How can I do that?

Come by the Government Undergraduate Program Office and talk to staff or the DUS about changing concentrations, or talk to one of the House Concentration Advisers. They can help you think about your reasons for changing your concentration, review your student record to see which classes can count for Government credit, and help you figure out which classes you will need to take. Once you’re sure you want to switch to Government, they can help you fill out an... Read more about I want to change my concentration to Government. How can I do that?

What’s the difference between Government and Social Studies?

The main difference between Government and Social Studies is that Social Studies requires a thesis, while Government does not.  Beyond that, you should think about how you want to approach your studies. The sophomore year looks quite different. In Social Studies, students take two semesters of Social Studies 10, a course focused on the texts of social science “greats.” In Government, students take Gov 97 in the spring of the sophomore year, a challenging course providing theoretical perspectives on “democracy...

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Why should I choose Government as my concentration?

Government incorporates the combined knowledge and methodology of several disciplines – history, economics, philosophy, psychology, and sociology, among others – and applies them to the study of politics.  The discipline has porous boundaries, and is therefore an extremely flexible concentration.  It allows you to decide the direction of your studies according to your inclinations and interests: globalization, human rights, the U.S. Presidency, war and terrorism, area studies, political philosophy....

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